July 28, 2014

70sscifiart:

In the 1970′s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.”

From The Public Domain Review, via Boing Boing

July 28, 2014
Richard Nixon Was an Expert on Panda Sex

Nixon: The problem with, uh—The problem, however, with pandas is that they don’t know how to mate. The only way they learn how is to watch other pandas mate. You see?

Noyes: [laughs]

Nixon: And, so they’re keeping them there a little while—these are younger ones—

Noyes: I see.

Nixon: —to sort of learn, you know, how it’s done.

Noyes: Sure, learn the ropes—

Nixon: Now, if they don’t learn it they’ll get over here and nothing will happen, so I just thought you should just have your best reporter out there to see whether these pandas—

Noyes: Well, we certainly will—

Nixon: —have learned. So, now that I’ve given you the story of pandas let me let you get back to your more serious questions. [laughter]

There’s audio at Open Culture, too. (Of the Nixon interview, not of panda sex.)

July 25, 2014
emoji.zone

Gaaaaaaahhh!

July 20, 2014
An Animated .gif of Zack Braff Getting Punched in the Face to the Tune of Enya's "Sail Away"

So satisfying.

July 17, 2014
I love this. It’s the cover of Pacific San Diego magazine, just in time for San Diego Comicon and San Diego Pride. (Via Robot 6.)

I love this. It’s the cover of Pacific San Diego magazine, just in time for San Diego Comicon and San Diego Pride. (Via Robot 6.)

July 15, 2014
dennisculver:

pizza-party:

benito-cereno:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

There are many different ways to format a script, but this is one that is more courteous to the rest of the creative team, notably the letterer. This format is very close to what I use.

You can’t do much better than a script format that’s fredvanlente and Nate Piekos approved!

I used this on a script I did for Jim and it made him so so happy.

dennisculver:

pizza-party:

benito-cereno:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

There are many different ways to format a script, but this is one that is more courteous to the rest of the creative team, notably the letterer. This format is very close to what I use.

You can’t do much better than a script format that’s fredvanlente and Nate Piekos approved!

I used this on a script I did for Jim and it made him so so happy.

July 15, 2014
This is exactly what life is like for me as a man. Every morning, it’s a new army of marauding animals for me to scream at and fight as I make my way to the bathroom. It gets tiring, after a while, but such is the lot of men.

This is exactly what life is like for me as a man. Every morning, it’s a new army of marauding animals for me to scream at and fight as I make my way to the bathroom. It gets tiring, after a while, but such is the lot of men.

July 14, 2014
Why Is Every Metal Detecting Website Constructed from Garbage?

I mean, I have my theories, but this is a truly horrific collection of screenshots.

July 11, 2014
Maternity box

Every mother in Finland, regardless of income or anything else, is eligible to get this box after 154 days of pregnancy. It costs nothing, to get it all an expectant mother needs to do is fill out a basic form and submit a certificate of pregnancy from her healthcare provider. I got my box today and this was what it had!

Well, that’s just downright civilized.

July 10, 2014
The History of the Egg Cream and How to Make One in the Authentic Brooklyn Style

Egg creams are totally delicious and I always thought they were harder to make than this.

July 9, 2014

lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots

The robot rebellion is not as dark as Terminator would have you believe.

(Source: pierregrassou)

July 8, 2014
Heart-shaped map of the world from 1566. (Via Designers Go to Heaven.)

Heart-shaped map of the world from 1566. (Via Designers Go to Heaven.)

July 7, 2014
I can’t find this book anywhere online and it’s killing me. (Via Wm. Steven Humphrey on Twitter.)

I can’t find this book anywhere online and it’s killing me. (Via Wm. Steven Humphrey on Twitter.)

July 1, 2014

I admire the work it must’ve taken to make this Vine look easy.

June 30, 2014
I found this poster here.

I found this poster here.